Augustine’s Confessions

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April 14, 2017 – MCAT CARS Passage

Question: What is your summary of the author’s main ideas. Post your own answer in the comments before reading those made by others.

His [Augustine’s] monastic base was still combined with travel, always on horseback (without stirrups).
—Robin Lane Fox

Robin Lane Fox, a British classical scholar, was the historical adviser for Oliver Stone’s godawful movie Alexander. He asked to be, and was, repaid by riding bareback in the movie, in the front line of Alexander’s cavalry. He is an adventurous fellow. Now he tells us he can reveal the hitherto-unknown deep meanings of Augustine’s Confessions, the book in which Augustine described his own life from his birth in 354, to his early belief in Manichaeism, to his baptism in Milan and the death of his mother, Monnica, in 387. He takes over five hundred pages to get us to the time Confessions was written (397), Augustine’s forty-third year (with thirty-three years more to live).

Lane Fox’s book largely traces the progress of Augustine with reference to dreams, conversions, ascents, and visions. He sets a low bar for these mystical events. In the famous garden “conversion scene” in 386 AD, for instance, Lane Fox claims that the appearance of Lady Continence talking to Augustine was an actual vision—though he admits that the previous image (of seductive women pulling Augustine back from his decision) is a literary convention.

To assure us that prophetic dreams, mystical ascents, and visions were common and believed in, he traces their influence on the thought and actions of two men who were Augustine’s contemporaries, though Augustine did not know, know of, or read them. He locates Augustine (354–430) by a kind of triangulation, tracing similarities with, and differences from, the Christian bishop Synesius of Cyrene (circa 373–414) and the pagan orator Libanius of Antioch (circa 314–393). Since these men are less known than Augustine, this is explaining ignotum per ignotius. He thinks of it, rather, as “like a triptych on a medieval Christian altar,” with Libanius on the left “casting a look of profound disapproval up at Augustine,” and the Christian Synesius on the right “looking up with tempered adoration.” Lane Fox wants us to know that the other two believed, like Augustine, in dreams, ascents, visions, and devils—though the more interesting question would be who, at the time, did not.

He brings in the other two not only to learn about attitudes toward the supernatural. Every sameness or difference of the three is recorded, as on a checklist. Augustine studied hard at school—so did they. Augustine had a concubine, and so did Libanius. He was a bishop, and so was Synesius. But Synesius loved to hunt, and Augustine did not. Did Augustine have throat problems? Libanius had migraines and gout. This is what Lane Fox calls significantly “similar health problem[s],” but who of us doesn’t have some illness sometime?

The conviction grows that if Augustine had at any time described himself as sneezing, Synesius or Libanius would be found doing or not doing that. He not only compares what the three men did, but imagines what they would have thought of each other if they had been acquainted.

Mind reading is another part of Lane Fox’s method. When in 386 Augustine leaves the profession of rhetoric, which he taught first in Carthage and then in Rome and Milan, Libanius, who lived for rhetoric, “would have snorted in disgust,” but Synesius could have helped Augustine hone his arguments in “a ‘conference call’ with Augustine and [Augustine’s friend] Nebridius,” had cell phones existed in the fourth century and had they known whom to call. It becomes wearying to watch Lane Fox leap from one of his three yoked horses to the other as they gallop forward, though he seems to find it as exhilarating as riding with Alexander’s cavalry.

Adapted from Nybooks.

Review

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This was an article on History.

Have a great day.
Jack Westin
MCAT CARS Instructor.
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21 Comments


  1. Fox = British scholar & historical advisor for the movie of Augustine;
    Fox’s book = traces of Augustine’s progress + by comparing with Cyrene & Antioch –> study attitude toward supernatural, similarities & differences, mind reading interpretation

    Reply

  2. MI: Lane => triangulating Augustine-Libanius-Synesius to mind read + explain mystics

    Reply

  3. compared Augustine to others in order to better understand Augustine

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  4. MI: lox trace augustines life/ augustine vs. syneius +libanius
    Tone: disgusted

    Reply

  5. MIP: Fox advisor = book Augustine = mystical visions; augustine visions belief = sim syn/lib

    Reply

  6. MI: RF’s method of revealing meaning A’s Conf.=not good
    tone: –

    Reply

  7. Very negative view on author. Book had set low bar for qualifications, irrelevant 2 other characters, and mind reading

    Reply

  8. MIP: Fox tries to convince that mystical events are normal + main story element; tone = –

    Reply

  9. MI: Fox traces Augestine’s life
    MI2: Fox compares Aug to Sys and Liban

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  10. MIP: Fox proves supernatural

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  11. fox book = vision + similarity of (Aug + cs + L)

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  12. MIP: Fox’s interpretation of Augustine’s Confession is not accurate (mind reading, use of two other men).

    Reply

  13. MIP: Augustine similar and different to contemporaries

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  14. Robin Fox’s book = Augustine and 2 of his contemporaries compared in order to understand Augustine’s Confessions book.

    Reply

  15. Fox = interpret Augustine’s Confession book = compare him to 2 men

    Reply

  16. FOx’s book=2 friends similar to Augustine

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  17. Fox= interpret Augustine + compare to two other men

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  18. Fox book reveals that in that time dreams/visions were thought to be real

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  19. Fox’s Book = Aug Conf based on visions, support of theory = triangulation + triptych EX (Lib, Syn, +Aug) = attitudes toward supernatural; author = negative

    Reply

  20. MIP: Fox compares Augustine with two other contemporaries.
    Tone: neutral

    Reply

  21. The author seems to be critical of Robert Lane Fox’s analysis of Augustines’ Confessions. He supports this by stating that Fox is too adventurous in his analysis, and gives examples of this claim.

    Reply

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